Archive for the ‘Mental Survival’ Category

Fire srarter

March 6, 2017

Early warning trip lines

March 6, 2017

In a real emergency, it doesn’t matter whether you are bugging in or out, you may need to be warned of intruders. Today many of us sit at home with the doors locked, window closed and air conditioning keeping the temperature under control. After a disaster, we may have to keep all our window open, to try to stay cool. This eliminates some of the security we normally have. If you have people, who are trying to take advantage of the situation by looting you may need to rig up some early warning systems.

Fortunately there are many simple ways to give you early warning of intruders. Dogs are great, one of the best early warning systems. Often smaller dogs are more alert and will be quicker to bark. Get your dog ahead of time and get to understand your dog’s reactions. With a bit of training your dog can be a very effective early warning system. In addition, depending on the type of dog they can discourage prowlers.

One of the simplest early warning systems is to set up tripwires. Tripwire systems are very simple to put up and use. You just have to be sure that the tripwires blend in well with the surrounding. Some types of fishing lines works well, you can get fishing line in different colors.

Camp alarms

March 6, 2017

Another simple alarm that can be used in your home or even a motel room is to put an empty glass jar upside down on your doorknob. This will fall (and make a loud noise, except on carpet) should someone turn the doorknob. (Warning- the bottle can break leaving glass fragments on the floor). A soda can filled with loose change balanced on the doorknob will make a lot of noise if someone attempts to enter. Windows also easy to trap with cans of change or jars.

Les stroud survival tactics

December 6, 2016

01* In cold or freezing conditions, the worst thing you can do is let yourself get sweaty. He constantly mentions that if you get sweaty, you should let the sweat dry (he mentions this tip in almost every episode).

02* Use a lens from a camcorder to start a fire (as if it is a Magnifying Glass)
03* Always carry a good multitool (eg. Leatherman Wave or Swiss Army Explorer Plus).
04* Break wood between two trees to keep from hurting yourself.
05* Cut water-vine in swamps and jungles and place a cup at the opening to collect water.
06* Wipe mud over your skin to protect against mosquitoes.
07* If you catch lean food eat as much of the animal as possible, except the entrails. Certain wild animals have extremely low levels of body fat, which may lead to death by rabbit starvation.
08* To start a fire with a lighter that has no fluid, use a piece of tissue formed into a cone at one end with a ball of sock lint stuffed into the cone to catch the spark that comes off the lighter. This only works if the socks are manufactured from 100% cotton. He refers to this as a prison match (and tells viewers not to ask him why he knows how to make it).
09* Use a snowmobile seat cover to melt snow in the sunlight.
10* Don’t play the harmonica when polar bears are possibly around because they are attracted to strange noises.
11* Use corn chips to hold a flame in a manner similar to a candle wick.
12* Boil water by placing heated rocks in it. This is done when a water container cannot be held directly over a fire.
13* Heat rocks over fire and place them around the body as heating packs while sleeping or resting.
14* Use an emptied coconut shell filled with coconut fibers to carry a smoldering coal. This prevents the need to light another fire from scratch.
15* Use cow dung to keep a fire smoldering while away. This prevents the need to light another fire from scratch.
16* Use the elastic strap from a pair of boxers as a slingshot to fire a fishing spear.
17* Soak the foam cushion of a broken snowmobile in gasoline to use as fire fuel in the Canadian Arctic.
18* Determine the time until sunset by measuring the distance between the sun and horizon, wherein each width of your hand equals one hour.
19* Use moss from the north side of a tree to gain bearings without a compass (though he added that this method, though accurate in his case, is often unreliable).
20* When opening a conch shell, crack the point on the back and scrape out the meat inside.
21* To get fresh water on an island build a solar still by finding a box (or something similar) and put seawater and plants inside, along with a smaller container in the direct center, and cover it tightly with a plastic sheet. Then put a rock in the center of the plastic. The plants will sweat fresh water which will evaporate, condense onto the plastic and drip into the container.
22* Too much coconut milk causes diarrhea.
23* The Five “W’s” of Survival: o Weather: Temperature of the area, know what kind of shelter you need. o Wood: How much wood is around for both fire and shelter. o Wigglies: spiders, scorpions, snakes, anything that can bite you or poison you. o Widowmakers: rocks, trees, large animals, anything that can fall on you or attack you. o Water: Where will you get water, how will you obtain it.
24* Use a potato peeler on thin branches to create very curly wood shavings. These are great for getting very small flames turned into big ones.
25* Always check your boots for “Wigglies.”
26* Use large rock pieces and twigs to setup trap for small animals by placing an edible bait to the supporting twig (Les caught a squirrel in the Utah canyonlands once, he cooked it over fire for a long time to burn off parasites before eating)
27* Set up a trap in the swamp or river bank by sticking wood sticks in a pattern that looks like a square with the top side slightly open in a v-shape , place a bait inside to wait for a turtle or other animals.
28* To create smoke signal, burn damp wood chips over fire.                                                                                               29* Before sleep pee so your body isn’t trying to keep the water inside you warm.
30* Eat Something before you sleep helps insides get warmer.

Wet wood lighting

November 25, 2016

How do you light wet wood?

Use a sharp knife/hatchet to strip away as much bark and wet wood as possible. If you can use a hatchet to split larger pieces of wood into kindling, this will expose the drier inner layers. Start a small fire using the stripped kindling. Use the small fire to heat and dry the larger pieces.

Clean water

November 24, 2016

Survival Pinterest!

November 24, 2016

I thought you’d like this Pin on Pinterest… http://pin.it/AsaP94-

Help in the back country

November 18, 2016
  

After running from law enforcement, the SAR team rescued two suspects.Running from law esubjects who suffered hypothermia and other cold related illnesses. Photo/Provided

After running from law enforcement, the SAR team rescued two suspects who suffered from hypothermia. Photo/Provided

By Kathryn Reed

Inappropriate clothing and shoes, no plan for if things go wrong, and unrealistic expectations that a cell phone will reach help that is nearby.

This is increasingly what search and rescue teams with El Dorado County are finding. It’s the result of more people in the woods and so many of them being unprepared. The movie “Wild” has helped perpetuate the idea that inexperienced hikers will survive.

This fall two women had to be rescued near Cascade Falls because they weren’t prepared for the storm that came in even though forecasters had been talking about it for days. They said they didn’t know about the pending storm and thought spandex leggings would be sufficient. They got disoriented and told rescuers they were going to die. They didn’t – thanks to volunteers who brought them back to safety.

That’s a routine call.

The number of calls El Dorado County search and rescue crews go on has doubled since 2010. In 2015, EDSO SAR was called 89 times. (That doesn’t mean they went out each time.) In the first 10 months of 2016, SAR has been called 130 times. Most of those people don’t live in the area.

Training is necessary to keep the team sharp. Photo/Provided

Training is necessary to keep the team sharp. Photo/Provided

“People are coming to the area without physical fitness or the experience to recreate safely,” sheriff’s Deputy Greg Almos told Lake Tahoe News.

Almos runs the El Dorado County Sheriff’s Department SAR program. It’s made up about 30 volunteers in Tahoe; of those about a dozen are active on a regular basis.

Eagle Falls is where they go to the most; with twisted ankles a routine issue. Many people are less than a mile from the trailhead. Their lack of fitness contributes to the initial injury and then not being able to make it out, Almos said. The altitude and weather are other contributing factors.

The veteran SAR leader is an advocate for getting people outdoors, but he also believes there needs to be responsibility and common sense. This means education before getting on the trail.

A hiker who suffered a foot injury this summer at Eagle Falls is carried to the trailhead. Photo/Provided

A hiker who suffered a foot injury this summer at Eagle Falls is carried to the trailhead. Photo/Provided

People go for day hikes without bringing another layer for when the temperatures in the mountains drop. They don’t have packs with the essentials – like enough water, food, a flashlight, even a map. Nor do they have a plan in case they don’t make it out.

“It’s amazing how many people I talk to when I discuss a save your life plan over the phone and they cannot fathom why we are not there. When I say it will take several hours to get there and that they need to make preparations to survive, and I tell them what to expect and say it could be four hours, I get arguments,” Almos said. “After 20 minutes they call to say ‘where are you?’ I ask them how long it took to get to the top of Tallac. They say six hours. I’ve had people straight up say where is the helicopter. This isn’t Uber. People have a hard time understanding that.”

Then there are the times when people don’t know where they are. It’s getting harder to trace cell phone numbers because of privacy laws. Search warrants can sometimes be obtained after the fact. That is why dispatchers ask for consent to track people’s phones.

The helicopter arrives to transport a lost person from Maggies Peak in February. Photo/Provided

The helicopter arrives to transport a lost person from Maggies Peak in February. Photo/Provided

A relatively new phenomenon searchers have been dealing with is “meet-up groups.” These are Internet-based groups where random people meet for a certain activity. They aren’t abiding by the basic protocols of hiking at the speed of the slowest person and making sure everyone returns to the trailhead.

“We are getting people who are leaving people out there. This is an epidemic I think we are going to see an awful lot more of,” Almos said.

Descriptions of what they were wearing or looked like are often vague.

Compounding the problem is friends and relatives back home who might call to report the person overdue often don’t know where the person was exactly going or with whom.

About a dozen of these calls are now happening annually.

Nothing is routine, and it’s not unusual for rescues to require technical skills – especially at Lover’s Leap and the cliff area at Vikingsholm. Climbers get stuck.

Their rescuers aren’t getting paid. Search team members provide their own gear.

It’s not unusual in the busy summer season to get back-to-back calls. Sometimes they are on a call for consecutive days. They receive training, but they all come to the “job” with a love for the outdoors and a desire to help others.

All of the volunteer search and rescue members are on-the-ground team. There is the management team that runs the command post and sets up the coordination, a Nordic team, snowmobile group, mountain rescue unit that handles extreme weather backcountry cases, and K-9 teams. The West Slope has an equestrian group and OHV.

And the people they rescue are not charged a dime.

Making decisions

November 22, 2013

In a survival situation those who do not make decisions die. Bad decisions can always be corrected. If you don’t decide and fast you will die.

Leaders are not born. They learn and develop their skills with their actions. In other words leaders are those who achieve good results.

So, think, observe and plan. Then act. This is a key to survival.

21 December 2012 around the corner. Are you prepared?

December 5, 2012

Survival is not an act of being comfortable but sustaining life until you are rescued.

What happens if there is no rescue? What do you do then? Well number one is do not lose control of your thoughts and actions. Learn and practice survival all the time. What is survival? Is it too late to start.

S……..Size up the situation STOP: Stop,Think, Observe and Plan
U…….Use all your senses. Undue haste makes waste
R……..Remember where you are.
V……..Vanquish Fear and Panic
I…….. Improvise, adapt and overcome.
V…….Value Living.
A…….Act like the natives.
L……..Live by your wits and continue to learn more.

The best you can do is not to worry and stay clam. Worry never has solved and issue. Worry is the diversion of positive energy into negative or nervous energy. There is no production of useful activity.

If an emergency happens like Sandy, Katrina, Earth quakes etc, a calm head will prevail. It is good to have a plan. However plans tend to fall apart. With that said, having a plan is  good place to start.

Live by the rules of three. Prepare by the rules of three. The rules are as follows:  you have three minutes to survive with out air, 3 hours to survive in harsh environment (snow, desert, heat, cold weather etc), 3 days with out water and 3 weeks without food.  Make your preparations according to the rules of three.

Your mind is the best survival tool you have. If you keep it uncluttered from fear and confusion, you will survive. God gave you dominion over the earth and sea. Know that all you need is around you. All you have to do is look and listen.

With the above information, everyone is prepared for 21 Dec 2012 no matter what happens.

For more detailed information: go to http://mountainsurvival.com or http://911survival.com